posted on 3.5.13

Thank you, BBC Radio 1, for filming this teenager telling Mila Kunis about his life for 7 minutes.

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posted on 1.27.12 I FOUND ICE CUBES ‘GOOD DAY’

murkavenue:

CLUE 1:
     “went to short dogs house,
       they was watching Yo MTV
       RAPS”
Yo MTV RAPS first aired:
               Aug 6th 1988
CLUE 2:
Ice Cubes single “today was a good day” released on:
               Feb 23 1993
CLUE 3:
      ”The Lakers beat the Super 
       Sonics”
Dates between Yo MTV Raps air date AUGUST 6 1988 and the release of the single FEBRUARY 23 1993 where the Lakers beat the Super Sonics:
      Nov 11 1988    114-103
      Nov 30 1988    110-106
      Apr    4 1989    115-97
      Apr  23 1989    121-117
      Jan  17 1990    100-90
      Feb  28 1990    112-107
      Mar  25 1990    116-94
      Apr  17  1990    102-101
      Jan  18  1991    105-96
      Mar  24  1991    113-96
      Apr  21  1991    103-100
      Jan  20  1992    116-110
CLUE 4:
Dates of those Laker wins over SuperSonics where it was a clear day with no Smog:
                Nov 30 1988
                Apr   4  1989
                Jan 18  1991
                Jan 20  1992
CLUE 5:
     “Got a beep from Kim, and
         she can fuck all night”
beepers weren’t adopted by mobile phone companies until the 1990s. Dates left where mobile beepers were availible to public:
                 Jan 18 1991
                 Jan 20 1992
CLUE 6:
Ice Cube starred in the film “Boyz in the hood” that released late Summer of 1991, but was being filmed mid-late 1990 early 1991 and Ice Cube was busy on set filming the movie Jan 18 1991 too busy to be lounging around the streets with no plans. Ladies and Gentlemen..

The ONLY day where:
Yo MTV Raps was on air
It was a clear and smogless day
Beepers were commercially sold
Lakers beat the SuperSonics
and Ice Cube had no events to attend was…
         
          JANUARY 20 1992
      National Good Day Day

-Donovan

This man deserves a Pulitzer.

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posted on 4.26.11

soupsoup:

Alisa Miller : The Bad News About The News

Please watch this.

Alisa Miller, head of Public Radio International, talks about why — though we want to know more about the world than ever — the US news media is actually showing less. Eye-opening stats and graphs. (Recorded March 2008 in Monterey, California. Duration: 4:29.)

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posted on 3.15.11 Some Stuff About PAX East, LA Noire, and the Press

brianfeldman:

This past weekend, Boston played host to PAX East, a video game convention. An incredibly large video game convention that most major publishers and developers, and a lot of smaller ones exhibited at. It was very fun and I enjoyed a lot of what I saw, even if I didn’t get to everything.

Probably the most gratifying part of the experience was that I got to play reporter for a little bit in two separate instances. The first was during a press presentation for LA Noire and the second was during a writing workshop/panel.

The LA Noire press showing was enlightening for a number of reasons. Firstly, because the game looks very interesting. But secondly, and more importantly, because holy shit who on earth was I in that room with?

Read More

I’m reblogging this not just because I’m mentioned in it, but because it’s worth reading — especially for all you folks concerned about “gamz jarnalism.”

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posted on 3.3.11
“In fact viewership of al Jazeera is going up in the United States because it’s real news. You may not agree with it, but you feel like you’re getting real news around the clock instead of a million commercials and, you know, arguments between talking heads and the kind of stuff that we do on our news which, you know, is not particularly informative to us, let alone foreigners.”
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posted on 2.15.11
A metaphor for the current state of print journalism.

A metaphor for the current state of print journalism.

Comments
posted on 11.13.10
“The commercial success of both Fox News and MSNBC is a source of nonpartisan sadness for me. While I can appreciate the financial logic of drowning television viewers in a flood of opinions designed to confirm their own biases, the trend is not good for the republic. It is, though, the natural outcome of a growing sense of national entitlement. Daniel Patrick Moynihan’s oft-quoted observation that “everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not his own facts,” seems almost quaint in an environment that flaunts opinions as though they were facts.

And so, among the many benefits we have come to believe the founding fathers intended for us, the latest is news we can choose. Beginning, perhaps, from the reasonable perspective that absolute objectivity is unattainable, Fox News and MSNBC no longer even attempt it. They show us the world not as it is, but as partisans (and loyal viewers) at either end of the political spectrum would like it to be. This is to journalism what Bernie Madoff was to investment: He told his customers what they wanted to hear, and by the time they learned the truth, their money was gone.

It is also part of a pervasive ethos that eschews facts in favor of an idealized reality. The fashion industry has apparently known this for years: Esquire magazine recently found that men’s jeans from a variety of name-brand manufacturers are cut large but labeled small. The actual waist sizes are anywhere from three to six inches roomier than their labels insist.

Perhaps it doesn’t matter that we are being flattered into believing what any full-length mirror can tell us is untrue. But when our accountants, bankers and lawyers, our doctors and our politicians tell us only what we want to hear, despite hard evidence to the contrary, we are headed for disaster. We need only look at our housing industry, our credit card debt, the cost of two wars subsidized by borrowed money, and the rising deficit to understand the dangers of entitlement run rampant. We celebrate truth as a virtue, but only in the abstract. What we really need in our search for truth is a commodity that used to be at the heart of good journalism: facts — along with a willingness to present those facts without fear or favor.”
From: Ted Koppel, longtime managing editor of ABC News’ Nightline, in a Washington Post guest editorial on the death of real news

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posted on 11.3.10
“We’re sorry for claiming Captain Kirk was in command of Captain Picard’s starship.”
From: 

News.com.au made the sort of mistake you just don’t make, and was forced to print an article-length retraction.

[nca.]

(via thedailywhat)

Best part is the addendum: “We’re also sorry for any errors in this apology.”

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posted on 7.29.10
“I’m acutely aware that this image will be seen by children, who will undoubtedly find it distressing. We have consulted with a number of child psychologists about its potential impact … In the end, I felt that the image is a window into the reality of what is happening — and what can happen — in a war that affects and involves all of us. I would rather confront readers with the Taliban’s treatment of women than ignore it. I would rather people know that reality as they make up their minds about what the U.S. and its allies should do in Afghanistan.”
From: Time managing editor Richard Stengel, on his decision to put a photo of an Afghan woman who was mutilated by the Taliban on the cover of the magazine (via New York Mag) (via soupsoup)

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